Plastics - PlastiGlideTM Coating

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Industrial Coating Services for Plastics

Plastics including glass filled nylons, that can withstand 300° F, have successfully been coated with a PTFE or dry film lubricant industrial coatings. The tightly bonded coating prevents glass fibers or fillers of any kind from protruding from the surface. In fact, the higher percentage of glass or fiber filler allows even higher bond strength of the protective, low friction layer. Successes include automotive steering rack dampers, water valves, water conditioner parts, coin sorter parts, and plastic sheet cup tooling molds.  Orion has formulated the PlastiGlide™ industrial coating process for Nylon, Glass Filled Nylon, PBT and other plastic compounds.

When most consumers think of nylon, they imagine the fiber in items such as clothing, bags and luggage, fishing line, or common household goods. However, this synthetic polymer has numerous industrial uses. Nylon appears in gears, conveyor belts, fasteners, circuit boards, and miscellaneous machine parts. The material even shows up in military applications like flak vests, parachutes, and paracord rope. Many of its uses derive from its unique properties, such as its resistance to wear and tear, heat, oil, alcohol, and other related solvents.

However, some specialized nylon uses require specialized treatments and coatings. That’s where PlastiGlide™ comes into play. For instance, consider glass-filled nylon, a specialized thermoplastic. Glass-filled nylon provides several advantages over the regular synthetic. It can be almost twice as stiff and enjoys a tensile strength of up to 70 percent more than ordinary nylon. It’s time-and-a-half as hard as ordinary nylon, and it expands much less when subjected to higher heat.

Glass-filled nylon is formed through an additional step during the regular nylon manufacturing process. The synthesis process often involves combining hexamethylene diamine monomers and adipic acid, which results in the creation of so-called nylon salts. Then manufacturers introduce glass fibers into the nylon in amounts ranging from 10 percent to 40 percent of total mass. This addition leads to all the above benefits.

But glass-filled nylon also has its drawbacks. It can be incredibly abrasive, wearing down any parts it comes in contact with. It’s also far more brittle than standard nylon, heavier, fractures easier at weld lines, and costs significantly more. Such downsides can cause some companies to question whether or not they want to use the material.

Of course, plenty still do turn to glass-filled nylon. It finds its primary use in the automobile industry. Though auto manufacturers initially started employing it during the 1950s, it has only grown in prominence as designers have tried to meld increased strength with lighter components. Though car and truck engines place a heavy heat and stress load on nearby parts, glass-filled nylon can endure both remarkably well. Some specific applications include speedometer gears, windshield wiper mechanisms, bearings, fender extensions, door-latch mechanisms, and more.

This is where PlastiGlide™ comes into play. Plastics (including glass-filled nylons) that can withstand 300° F have successfully been coated with a PTFE or dry film lubricant industrial coatings. The tightly bonded coating prevents glass fibers or fillers of any kind from protruding from the surface. In fact, the higher percentage of glass or fiber filler allows an even higher bond strength of the protective, low friction layer. Successes include:

  • automotive steering rack dampers
  • water valves
  • water conditioner part
  • coin sorter parts
  • plastic sheet cup tooling molds and more